Tuesday, April 12, 2016

In a Vase: Spring Yellow

Today's vase was a hasty one, but it seemed a good opportunity to use flowers of late spring.
The first to be picked was Ornithogalum arabicum, the so-called Star of Bethlehem.  Last year's blooms were spectacular, while this year's have been more wispy, despite my adding a second clump.  Still, they are now favorites of mine for their translucent white petals and shiny black middles.
To go with the Ornithogalum, there is Tetraneuris acaulis, a slender handful of stems topped by bright daisies.
And there is the first showing from Aquilegia chrysantha "Swallowtail".  Unmistakably part of the columbine family, A. chrysantha is actually a native of this region.  It enjoys a good reputation for growing here in a wide range of exposures from sun to shade, so long as its roots are kept moist and cool.  The variety "Swallowtail" has extra long spurs.  These give a light, airy look to the plant while in bloom; but they seem to break often, which I find distracting, so I might choose a different variety next time.  The flowers are a clear, almost lemon, yellow, a highly desirable colour.
And finally there is some Lantana in the vase.  This is from plants that were already blooming when we bought the house; they have taught me just how reliable Lantana is in a suitable location!
This little cluster of flowers went into the handthrown pot I made a couple of years ago.
Linking with other spring vases at Rambling in the Garden...

Have a great week!


12 comments:

  1. Your vase manages to capture the heat of the Arizona sun.

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    1. That's getting easier to do every week, Loree ;-)

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  2. I really love the shape of this vase and the flowers....beautifully architectural with a fabulous variety of yellow blooms...especially love the Aquilegia!

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    1. Thanks so much, Donna! Those fly-away flowers needed a fairly solid vase, I think ;-) I've been so happy to find there were Aquilegias for this region!

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  3. Lovely! I knew there was at least one columbine native to the warm regions of the country but I didn't know about the beautiful 'Swallowtail'. I'll have to look around for it. I have just one Aquilegia, a blue and white hybrid, but, of the 3 plants I originally had, only one has returned to bloom this year.

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    1. I've read at least one rave review on the A. chrysantha varieties for growing here, Kris. 'Swallowtail' was ordered from High Country Gardens, and it may be exclusive with them. I tried A. desertorum last year and was very happy with it also. Still waiting for it to come into bloom this year, but it looks healthy... very similar to an orange and yellow one you showed from one of the botanic gardens - sorry I can't remember which - last year. I'm making a new olla for Swallowtail; it will need a cool, moist root run, but I'll try to keep it happy with a slow supply of water and plenty of mulch! Here's hoping...

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  4. That is a gorgeous pure yellow aquilegia, Amy - with such long stamens! The lantana is a brilliant colour choice to link all the blooms - thanks for sharing

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    1. Thanks, Cathy! The aquilegia blooms have quite a frothy effect in the garden, with those long stamens and longer spurs. Very much their own thing in comparison with the vulgaris types, but just as charming. I find I really like having all that lantana around - it's quite a workhorse here, very reliable!

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  5. Such a lovely arrangement Amy and thank you for telling me about the aquilegia on IG the other day - It is such a pretty flower and I would love to try it - another one for the list!
    - Kate x

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    1. I'm so pleased to find that I can add far more plants to my to-try list than I have had to remove... ;-) I'll be excited to see how it does if you do try it there!

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  6. This is so lovely Amy! Warm oranges and yellows to warm me up on a chilly spring morning. The yellow aquilegia is stunning. I am looking forward to seeing mine soon, although most of them are shades of pink and purple. I wonder if yours sets seed all over the place like mine.

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    1. Hopefully it will seed around (this is the first year I have grown it); I would love to have plenty of them and even more of my little A. desertorum. I think their behavior is similar to the hybrids: short-lived but self-seeding... So glad you enjoyed the post, Cathy - thanks!

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