Sunday, December 21, 2014

Burgeoning Buds

Eremophila buds, emu bush buds


I was delighted to look down at the little Eremophila this morning and have that sensation "wait a minute - something is different!".  What was different was tiny flower buds - lots of them.

Eremophilas are winter bloomers, but I haven't been too sure when my October-planted bush would reach the flowering stage.  Although I was confused initially about the identity of this variety (it came home tagless), I am now guessing that this is "Valentine", a readily available selection of Eremophila maculata.  Pink buds, of course!
eremophila buds, emu bush buds
E. maculata is the spotted Emu Bush; the common name of this Australian plant family is derived from the fruits, which are said to be eaten by emus in the wild.  No emus here, but the plant has thus far taken the Sonora climate like a true desert native.

A number of plants paused to settle in during the past weeks.  The hybrid tea rose "Sterling Silver" went through a gawky, do-nothing stage after I cut it back, but it is making up for lost time with an abundance of new growth.  I love the brilliant red-burgundy hues of new rose foliage.
"Sterling Silver" rose, new growth on rose, hybrid tea rose foliage
And some of the leaves have opened a bit further.
"Sterling Silver" rose foliage, rose foliage, rose leaves
The other plant on the verge of a full blooming spree is the Russelia (R.equisetiformis "Big Red"), which has been shooting out long stems elegantly laden with miniscule buds.
Russelia equisetiformis buds, Coral Fountain, Firecracker Plant
And when I say "long stems", it's partly because these are noticeably longer than earlier stems.  The plant is putting out some very robust growth.  There are still a few trumpets left from last month, but most of the red is growing tips and unopened buds.
Russelia equisetiformis, Big Red Russelia, Coral Fountain, Firecracker Plant
Next month promises well in my little desert garden.
Russelia equisetiformis, Coral Fountain, Russelia equisetiformis "Big Red"

4 comments:

  1. Oh to have a garden that has such beautiful blooms in winter!

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    1. I have to admit I am thoroughly enjoying it, Jessica :) However, come summer I will be needing all the pictures of shady trees and water that I can get!

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