Tuesday, April 7, 2015

The Wild Tree: April

Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree
These are the glory days of the wild Palo Verde tree I am following as part of Lucy's Tree Watching meme.  It is in full bloom.
Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree
Individual blossoms are perhaps an inch or two across (2.5-5 cm) with rounded petals flaring outward from long stamens finished with anthers in a bright sienna hue.
Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree
As the branches are pliable, the whole tree is dripping with brilliant yellow, forming a veil of bloom around the grey-green branches.
Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree
Deep inside, the tree is leafier than it was.
Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree
Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree
Outside branches boast mostly just flowers.
Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree
I took some pictures of the tree about a week ago since I was unsure how long the bloomtime would last.  There was just as much yellow then - perhaps more since there were fewer leaves - and more buds.  Now there are some spent flowers and some additional green cover at the centre of the tree.  The pictures I took then can be seen on my other blog since it was purely a photographic spree.  I think you will be able to see the slight difference one week has made.

These wild trees are in bloom all along the rural roadsides just now, creating a magical burst of colour in the desert.  And we have several clumps peeking over the wall surrounding our property.  This is one, and a very special sight at this time of year.

I'm linking this post to Lucy's at Loose and Leafy, where despite her computer difficulties, she kindly continues to host the once-a-month look at trees from around the world.  Here is little Parkinsonia floridum from the Sonora desert.
Parkinsonia floridum, blue palo verde, sonora desert tree

22 comments:

  1. Amy μου γεμισε η σελιδα σου απο τον ξανθο Απριλη!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    μια ομορφη!!!!!!!! μερα γεματη Ανοιξη σου ευχομαι

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    1. The little tree fills the air with gold :) I'm glad you enjoyed it, Angela!! Happy Wednesday!!

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  2. Je ne connaissais pas cet arbre ravissant, joliment photographié. Ce doit être plaisant de voir les rues bordées de cet arbre . Le spectacle doit être époustouflant de beauté. Les couleurs sont douces et agréables.
    Belle soirée

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    1. For a little while, the wild roadsides are full of this bloom, and in the city the streets and parking lots are planted with a hybrid Parkinsonia just as beautiful. So we have a brief burst of gold bloom before the summer heat! Many thanks, Jocelyne. Have a lovely day :)

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  3. Those are stunning blooms. They remind me of the golden wattles that flower in Australia during spring, but without any leaves, I think the Palo Verde would be a far more stunning sight! Beautiful photos :-)

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    1. I'm surprised that the green even shows up from a distance, since the leaves are hidden deep inside the flowering branches - a way to guard the foliage against drying winds, perhaps?? But I checked again, and the tree is visibly greener than it was a week ago. It is stunning! Thanks a lot :)

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  4. So very pretty!
    I especially like the last photo!

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    1. Thanks so much, Lea! Glad you enjoyed it :)

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  5. It's gorgeous, Amy. I'll be interested to hear how long it blooms. I don't see these locally and, according to Sunset's garden guide, my area seems to be unsuitable for all but one species. It does look like a good selection for the inland valleys, though.

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    1. I'm keeping an eye on its bloom time, Kris; it has already bloomed longer than I expected. I agree that it's perfectly adapted for inland desert, but I just checked the Dave's Garden site and found good reports on some varieties from such places as Manhattan Beach and San Diego, so who knows... ;-) The one problem I'm aware of is brittle limbs that can break in high winds, but that might affect coastal planting options, perhaps.

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  6. What a beautiful tree! You're lucky to be able to grow it. It's very mild in our corner of the world but not mild enough for this one, I'm afraid. I bet it's a favourite with wildlife.

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    1. Yes, I had a long visit from a Curve-Billed Thrasher while photographing there earlier. Unfortunately, I had the wrong lens so pictures weren't very good! I think it is one of the privileges of living in this unique climate that we can live with some uniquely beautiful plants whose range is, I'm afraid, rather limited by the demands of their native growing conditions...!

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  7. My goodness! That is quite a sight, I had no idea it would be so spectacular. I love the color, a beautiful yellow.

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    1. By next month it will be a quiet little clump of grey-green again, I'm sure. In the meantime it's splendid, isn't it?! The yellow is perfect... Glad you enjoyed it, Hollis!

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  8. Wow. It's a lovely tree. Must be quite a sight to see a few of them together.

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    1. It is! In some ways the wild ones make more impact with their spreading clumps (they must sucker pretty freely!) than the cultivated ones do with their single canopies of bloom. But it's all beautiful, and I would love to plant one of the thornless hybrids eventually!

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  9. Amy, those are really lovely photos. Makes me want to have that tree!

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    1. Thanks so much, Helen! Yes, it's exciting to have it around in its full splendour - though I like it in its mousy grey summer hues also... :)

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  10. What a wonderful tree, such a blaze of yellow colour.

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    1. It is such a quiet tree the rest of the year that I'm amazed at how extravagant a showing it makes in spring :)

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  11. A sky-ful of gold. What a glorious tree! I don't know this tree but I seem to remember once seeing a palo verde in California with a smooth green-toned trunk. Is this the same tree?

    Reading your post and several of the others, I realize that I don't know enough about where people are writing from, or the conditions under which the trees are growing. If you run out of things directly related to the tree, I'd enjoy hearing about the wider environment. I know I will be writing about that next month... or so the plan goes!

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    1. It may well come to a discussion of wider topics - after the bloom is all over ;-) There are a number of Palo Verde species: this is Parkinsonia floridum, the Blue Palo Verde. Some others have brighter green to their bark, and there is a hybrid "Desert Museum" - very popular locally! - that is thornless and grows to a fair size.

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