Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Wordless Wednesday: Portraits of a Helpful Toad

Toad, Arizona garden
Toad, Arizona garden
Weather Diary: Fair; High: 112 F (44 C)/Low: 81 F (27 C)

11 comments:

  1. υπεροχο!!!!!!!! μια …ψυχη!!!!!!!!
    ευχομαι μια ομορφη πεμπτη!!!!!
    αγγελικη

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    1. These became portraits - he was charming... in his way ;-) Have a lovely day, dear Aggeliki!!

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  2. Cette photo est magique. J'imagine que pour capturer cette image, il faut de la patience.
    Belle découverte....belle journée

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    1. Thank you so much, dear Jocelyne! To tell the truth, he was happily catching insects while I took the pictures - he had no wish to leave... ;-) Wishing you a wonderful day!

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  3. A toad! How wonderful! I've never seen either a frog or a toad in either my current garden or my last one. Yours looks happy too - or at least as happy as any toad ever looks.

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    1. I've been surprised at how many toads we have here, Kris. Our property is in the Hassayampa drainage area - a large area of washes and occasional summer flooding - so maybe we have more of these sorts of animals than would be typical elsewhere in the region. At any rate, they do their part in pest control in the garden! I think he was quite pleased. He had dug a shallow hole in the cooler, moister soil beside my Russelia and was apparently catching bugs while I photographed...

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  4. It's always such great complement for your garden when the wildlife moves in. How do those poor things cope in the desert heat...44C...wow!

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    1. I've been very pleased with how soon the wildlife has warmed up to our presence here, Matt! I think they see us as bringing in all sorts of wonderful innovations: plants, water hoses, soft mulch, horse feed, bug-attracting lights at night, etc. The desert toads have their own adaptations for the climate. I understand that they can mature from egg to adult very quickly - a week or so, if my memory is correct. Also, when aestivating, they form what is essentially a hard shell to reduce moisture loss. This chap doesn't seem to be finding it necessary to aestivate at the moment though ;-)

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  5. Replies
    1. Glad you do, Hollis! I wasn't sure how my toad pictures would go over ;-)

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  6. I like the new occupant of your garden, soon you will have to create a section on your blog devoted to wildlife ;)
    Are animals of rare beauty, natural insecticides garden ...
    Good week Amy!!

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