Thursday, September 15, 2016

In Bloom in September

The sun's rays are lower now, and shifting southward.  Temperatures have dropped just a little.  Days are shorter, and breezes are cooler.  At mid-month September is finally bringing relief after a long summer.

Not surprisingly, the garden is responding with increased bloom.  Mostly from plants that already had a few flowers and are now anxious to put on more.  But there are also the roses and an unexpected couple of flower clusters on Justicia californica.

Here is September for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day.

Central Bed:

The Alnwick Rose
Lagerstroemia indica "Dynamite"
Cuphea ignea "Vermillionaire"
Daniela
Russelia equisetiformis "Big Red"
Wollerton Old Hall with Salvia greggi

South Border:

Leucophyllum frustescens "Green Cloud" (?)
Catharanthus roseus, Eremophila hygrophana, and Leucophyllum frutescens
Pennisetum setaceum rubrum with Catharanthus roseus

East Border:

Lantana in front of Euphorbia tirucalli "Firesticks" and Acacia salicina
Caesalpinia pulcherrima

North Border:

Hamelia patens
Ruellia brittoniana
Justicia californica

White and Silver Garden:

Lantana
Ed. Here is one I missed yesterday.  My sister discovered it last night... by the fragrance!
Jasminum sambac 

Rose Border:

Crown Princess Margareta
I have also been taking advantage of the milder weather to do some long-awaited planting, mostly iris, cacti, and other hardy succulents.  But today is Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day, so here is September's showing in the desert garden.  If you like, you can check what is in bloom around the world in September at May Dreams Gardens.
Weather Diary: Fair; High: 96 F (36 C)/Low: 66 F (19 C); Humidity: 7%-31%


10 comments:

  1. Oh how I wish I could grow Russelia equisetiformis, and that Hamelia patens is a new one to me...what a beauty!

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    1. The Hamelia is an ongoing adventure, Loree: it likes a little more water than most of my plants, and it can die back to the ground with frost. But it survived last summer as a newbie so it must be pretty sturdy. And I'm told it's a great hummingbird plant so of course I had to try it ;-)

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  2. What grows in your desert garden is utterly remarkable, Amy! I picked up 3 Cuphea 'Vermillionaire' after seeing it in your garden. I've lost some orange-flowered Cuphea before but so far, so good with these.

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    1. Hope they do well for you too, Kris - I've been very happy with this one! It gets quite a bit of shade, which probably made a big difference getting it through its first summer.

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    1. Thanks so much, Jessica! The Hamelia has been a highly satisfactory addition :)

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  4. All beautiful, as in the reality...

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    1. Thank you (and thanks for your help, of course! ;-)

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