Sunday, February 15, 2015

Flowers and Fragrance

apricot blossoms, apricot bloom
As of last month, I have been looking forward to the new Garden Blogger's Fragrance theme, but I am not sure exactly when it is to come off.  In the meantime, it is Garden Blogger's Bloom Day with Carol at May Dreams Gardens, a meme for which this will be my first post.

For which reasons, I will go ahead and combine the two themes today.  The search for fragrant flowers has, not surprisingly, induced some curious gymnastics around my garden since most of my plants are still very small and can only be smelled by getting down on hands and knees, or by standing on one's head.

The photo below is a case in point.  At perhaps 12 in/41 cm high, the young lavender "Blueberry Ruffles" has finally begun to bloom; in fact, it is loaded with buds.  It had a difficult start, needing quite a bit of watering and general fussing over, but it is holding its own now, and the bees have discovered it.
Lavender stoechas "Blueberry Rufles", Spanish lavender
 I like it very much though I have to admit that I don't see much difference yet between it and my other Spanish lavender, Lavendula stoechas "Madrid", which also still has some flowers although they are at the other end of the bloom cycle.  In "Madrid" the colour is a little darker.
Lavender stoechas "Madrid", Spanish lavender
Lavendula stoechas Madrid
 I still cannot smell the flowers so much as the foliage, but that is undoubtedly fragrant!

Another flower that I have spent some extra time attempting to smell is the recently bloomed Berlandiera lyrata, with its elusive chocolate scent.  Smell or no, it is a wonderful addition to the Dry Corner by the acacia.
Berlandiera lyrata, chocolate flower
I was happily surprised to find how sweet a smell there is in Armeria.  No wonder the bees like it; I do too!  (No bees in this picture - only a small garden spider...)
Armeria
Nearby, Salvia greggii "Autumn Moon" is beginning to bloom again after a brief rest, while S. g. "Flame", on the other side of the bed, is just starting for the first time.  Here the flowers seem simply to carry the fragrance borne by the leaves.  I am liking this scent more and more - not to mention these plants as a whole, though Flame does show a tendency to sprawl across the ground...
Salvia greggii "Flame", Autumn Sage
Salvia greggii "Flame"

Salvia greggii "Autumn Moon", Autumn Sage
Salvia greggii "Autumn Moon"
Just beside the pink and white of S. g. "Autumn Moon", there is the wonderful miniature rose "Daniela", with a sweet rose fragrance in blooms that are actually quite large and sturdy on this little plant.
Rose "Daniela", miniature rose
And finally we will go just beyond the garden - as presently laid out! - to where the apricot tree opened its first blossoms this morning.  Several are just at nose-level; scent is light but sweet, the fragile beauty of the flowers is unmistakable.
apricot blossoms, apricot bloom
So there are the blooms, in particular the fragrant blooms, to be found in my garden now. 

ed.  And now I can also link to the Scent in the Garden theme at Wellywoman's blog!  
apricot blossoms, apricot bloom


14 comments:

  1. Beautiful!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. Thank you so much, Lea! Welcome to my garden :)

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  2. Oh those apricot blooms are so pretty. Does the tree produce fruit too?

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  3. Yes, it does! Last year we lost the entire crop to the birds, but this year I am prepared with netting...!

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  4. ανοιξιατικα χαμογελα!!!!!!!!!!!
    αγγελικη.

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    1. Yes! Wishing you a happy springtime, Angela!!!

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  5. How I'd love to have an apricot tree! You definitely need to add Coleonema to your fragrant collection of plants - the foliage is highly aromatic, hence its common name, Breath of Heaven.

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    1. Fortunately, there are some well-grown fruit trees on the property, Kris. I didn't do too well by the apricot last year, but I'm trying harder this - it's just been fed, at any rate :) I'll have to start hunting more vigorously for Coleonema, especially since I realized this morning just where it ought to go!

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  6. I always think of lavender when I think of fragrant flowers and that Spanish variety has such a vibrant colour too.

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    1. I feel the same way about lavender, Ann. I couldn't grow it very well in my last garden, so I'm trying to treat myself to plenty of it in this one ;)

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  7. Such a pity we can't get smell on these blasted machines! I can't for the life of me get any winter scent, despite the fact that everyone says my plants are fragrant. I think it is too cold here. I love the colour of that Salvia gregii Autumn Moon.
    I hope you didn't cause yourself too many aches and pains getting up close and personal with those blooms. I can always get down there but struggle back up!

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    1. All the little pebbly bits make it hard on the knees too LOL! Yes, a way to send the smells would be terrific. But I think it's harder to smell things in colder weather anyway - though maybe that's just my nose... Isn't that pink-and-white Autumn Moon wonderful? Terrific plant, and I'd never heard of it before I bought it!

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  8. Thank you Amy for joining in the scented post theme. It's fascinating to see what you have in flower. It's a little odd to me to see lavender in bloom. ;) We've got the first signs of spring flowers but we had a hard frost this morning so winter isn't finished with us yet. I haven't really set an exact date for the scented posts (work makes it a bit difficult for me to stick to regular postings times as deadlines tend to come at once), but I'm aiming for the middle of each month. I'd love it if you can join in again next month. :)

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    1. Beginning my garden here is requiring some readjustment to the seasons, I have to admit. I expect high summer to be the most difficult time, though I'm trying to plan for the garden to carry on through it. We shall see... I suppose each region has its own weather stresses and the plants that make up for them - like snowdrops, which I am now missing! I will keep my eyes out for next month's post now I understand the timing better. Thanks ;)

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